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Almost authentic: Scrambled Eggs with Fresh Corn

Scrambled Eggs with Fresh Corn

We’ve been eating a lot of scrambled eggs lately, both for weekend breakfasts and quick dinners during the week. While 2008 was definitely the Year of the Fried Egg around here, scrambled eggs have emerged as a late frontrunner in 2009. Who knows what next year will hold, but I don’t see our tastes changing anytime soon- they’re simply too delicious.

When I was growing up, scrambled eggs were always my comfort food. My mum made them for me whenever I was sick, worried about something, or had my braces tightened. (Thank goodness, otherwise I would have lived on ice cream and instant pudding alone for several days every three months. Actually, I probably would have enjoyed that.) I liked my eggs cooked quickly over a high heat, with minimal stirring to ensure the desired texture of separate, dry curds. Even a hint of “wet” to my eggs turned me right back to the ice cream.

When I got older and discovered cooking, I realized that my eggs of choice were hardly “choice” at all, according to the culinary elite. Most of my food heroes (Mark, Nigel, Nigella) advocate a slow-cooked, low-heat scramble as one that’s the most authentic. (By authentic I think they mean French; a Cordon Bleu-trained chef would likely regard my childhood eggs as nothing more than a broken-up omelette.) I gradually came around to this method, and these days I cook my eggs ever so slowly over the lowest of heats to achieve the creamiest, fluffiest result.

This recipe was my effort to make my go-to scramble recipe a little more interesting, and perhaps use up some veg from the crisper while I was at it. The sweetness of the corn works so well with the cheese, and makes this good for those who like a sweeter meal in the mornings. It might not be completely authentic, but it sure is good.

Note: I haven’t given cooking times for this recipe, as it really depends on the type of stove you have, and the pan you use. I have gas burners here in the UK, and my eggs become “slow-cooked” within ten minutes. At home in my Mum’s kitchen, with an electric stove and a cast-iron pan, I can stretch that to 20 or 30 if I want to. The point is, the slower the cooking, the creamier the eggs.

Scrambled Eggs with Fresh Corn

  • Scrambled Eggs with Fresh Corn
  • serves two
  • 2 tsp. butter
    kernels from 1 cob of corn, removed like this
    4 spring onions, finely chopped
    1 small red chili, finely chopped
    4 eggs
    2 Tbs. milk
    salt and pepper
    1/2 cup grated cheddar
    2 Tbs. chopped fresh coriander
  • 1. Heat the butter over medium heat in a non-stick frying pan. When it foams, add the corn, spring onions and chili and cook for 3-4 minutes. While the corn cooks, whisk the eggs and milk with a pinch of salt and grind of pepper in a small jug.

    2. Turn the heat down to very low and add the egg mixture to the frying pan. Let sit for a minute or so, until soft curds begin to form on the bottom of the pan. Using a wooden spoon or spatula, begin to break up these curds and any others that form, keeping the mixture moving all the time.

    3. When the eggs are mainly set, add the cheese and coriander. Keep the mixture moving until it’s done to your liking (if you like drier scrambled eggs, simply turn up the heat at this point). Serve with toast.

10 comments

  1. Jacqui says:

    i eat eggs for dinner all the time, and have also just discovered the magic of cooking them slowly on low heat. except sometimes i just get too impatient. :) love the idea of adding fresh corn!

  2. Dana says:

    Scrambled eggs are the breakfast of choice for my boys when I think they have been living off carbs are due some protein. I never think of them as dinner for the grown-ups with some lovely flavors like this thrown in. I need to broaden my horizons…

  3. Ele says:

    Jacqui- It makes a big difference, doesn’t it? I get impatient too sometimes- usually right at the end, so I’ll crank up the heat then :)

    Dana- Oddly, I never really had scrambled eggs for breakfast as a child- it was always a dinner when I was little. I love them any time of the day now!

  4. sarah says:

    Breakfast is my favourite meal and eggs are the best part. Maybe this weekend I will try cooking scrambled eggs more slowly–I don’t think I ever have thought about it much before. It sounds as if it makes a real difference. I will let you know!

  5. Eggs are a HUGE go to meal for dinner when no one really feels like cooking. I’m a toad-in-the-hole lover, but also make a killer omlette with just about anything in the house. My fav being left over fresh tomato sauce and mozzarella cheese and chopped basil.
    LOVE the idea of fresh corn and chilis in scrambled eggs. Thanks for the tip!

  6. Ele says:

    Sarah- Did you try it? I can’t imagine I’ll ever go back to quick-cooking them. Last time I made scrambled eggs for us, Andrew said to me “Hon, your eggs are getting runnier and runnier” I took it as a compliment ;)

    Nicole- Agreed! The ultimate nutritious convenience food! (Aside- it’s funny what you call “Toad in the Hole”- an egg inside a hole in piece of fried bread, right? My best friend introduced me to that years ago, when we were roomies. Here in the UK, Toad in the Hole is a completely different dish!)

  7. yum!!! I don’t think I’ve ever put corn in eggs, but it totally makes great sense. i just love the design of how you type up the recipes, so cute!

  8. Ele says:

    Sara- Thanks! I take no credit for that, though; it was my boyfriend’s idea and he implemented it!

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